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Nov 15

Soon, Cholesterol Problems Can Be Treated By Vaccines

cholesterolThis new vaccine provides alternatives other than statins, aiming for a protein that controls the cholesterol levels in the blood.
LDL cholesterol is a substance similar to lard, which circulates in the bloodstream. If too much cholesterol, the artery can become blocked so that can lead to heart disease and stroke.

A kind of new vaccine successfully lowering levels of LDL-bad cholesterol-on animal experiments the rats and macaque monkey.

The findings presented in this issue of the Elsevier journal Vaccine mentioned that-according to the authors from the University of New Mexico and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the us-this vaccine is potentially more powerful than just treatment with Statins.

The human body produces cholesterol to make hormones, vitamin D, and some of the molecules that help digestion of food. Cholesterol is also found in food.

LDL cholesterol is a substance similar to fat that circulates in the bloodstream. If too much cholesterol, the artery can become blocked so that can lead to heart disease and stroke.

According to the CDC, there are 73.5 million adults in the u.s. who have high LDL cholesterol levels. Diet and exercise are key to keeping low cholesterol anyway, but millions of people around the world drink Statins to lower cholesterol.

Statins have a number of serious side impacts, such as muscle pain, increased risk of diabetes, and a decline in cognitive ability.

This new vaccine provides alternatives other than statins, aiming for a protein that controls the cholesterol levels in the blood.

A single vaccines have been shown to lower cholesterol levels dramatically in rats and monkeys, so supposedly can be an effective treatment in humans.

Dr. Bryce Chackerian, one of the authors of the University of New Mexico, said, “one of the most interesting about this is that this new vaccine seemed far more effective than Statins alone.”

This new vaccine targeting PCSK9 protein that regulates cholesterol in the blood. This protein works by stimulating the body to shed a cholesterol receptor attached when being discharged from the body.

People who have mutations in these proteins occasionally suffer from an increased risk of heart disease and those who do not have such mutations have a reduced risk.

By targeting these proteins, the vaccine can lay off the protein functions, thereby reducing the amount of cholesterol in the blood.

The researchers tested a vaccine that in mice, and the result is a real decline in LDL cholesterol levels. They then test it on a small amount of macaque monkey, in unison with the use of statins, thus providing a dramatic decrease in cholesterol levels.

“Statins still became the most frequently prescribed medications for cholesterol. Although the drug was efficacious in some people, the drugs that have side impact and is not suitable for all, “said Dr. Alan Remaley, one of the authors of the study from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, part of the NIH.

“The results of our vaccine are surprising and can be considered a much more potent treatment for high cholesterol.”

There have been several drug company that developed the treatment of high cholesterol in a way, aiming for PCSK9, for example Alirocumab and Evolocumab, which just got the FDA approval.

Positive outcomes, however, their treatment using monoclonal antibodies are remarkably costly.
This new vaccine seems even more useful as compared to the monoclonal antibody-based treatment, with a lower price.

The researchers are now planning to expand their research on Monkey experiments and seeking commercial partners to advance the technology.